Measles Report from Florida Department of Health July 2018

Measles is a highly contagious disease among persons who are susceptible. The Florida Department of Health investigates all individuals with measles who spend time in Florida while infectious, including residents and visitors. However, only Florida residents are included in Florida’s case counts reported to the CDC.

State activity:

  • Two Florida residents and one visitor with confirmed measles associated with international exposures in Brazil and France were investigated in July.
  • The two Florida residents and were exposed to measles while traveling abroad. They had no measles vaccinations prior to exposure.
  • The visitor was exposed prior to arriving in the United States and had unknown vaccination status.
  • Thus far in 2018, a total of four Florida residents and three visitors with measles have spent time in Florida while infectious.
  • Contact investigations are conducted for both Florida residents and visitors with measles to determine the vaccination status of those potentially exposed to measles and to detect and prevent transmission.
    • In July, a total of 404 contacts who had possible exposure to measles were identified.
    • No outbreaks of measles were reported.
    • Contact investigations are important for every case of measles to determine the vaccination status for those potentially exposed to measles and to detect and prevent transmission.
  • Vaccination is the best way to prevent measles infections.In July, the two Florida residents with measles were never vaccinated prior to exposure and the visitor had unknown vaccination status.
  • In May, a total of 944 contacts were identified who had possible exposure to a case of measles.
    • In 2017, all measles cases (n=3) were exposed to the measles virus outside of Florida.
  • Vaccination is the best way to prevent measles infections. In May, two cases were never vaccinated against measles and two cases had unknown vaccination status.
  • Due to generally high vaccination rates, cases of measles in Florida residents are rare but occur every year and are most often associated with international travel.
    • The number of reported measles cases in Florida residents has remained at less than 10 cases per year since 2010.
    • In 2017, all measles cases (n=3) were exposed to the measles virus outside of Florida.
  • To learn more about measles, please visit http://www.floridahealth.gov/measles.

National activity:

  • Even though measles has been eliminated in the United States, cases occur every year, mostly among unvaccinated individuals. As of July 14, the CDC has reported 107 confirmed cases of measles so far in 2018. In 2017, the CDC reported a total of 118 cases.
  • In 2017, Minnesota experienced a large outbreak of measles in a community with low measles vaccination coverage that affected a total of 65 individuals. For detailed information on this outbreak see page 10.
  • The two dose measles vaccination schedule has been successful at decreasing cases, and measles was eliminated from the United States in 2000.

International activity:

  • Recently, increased measles activity has been reported all over the world. In May 2018, multiple measles outbreaks were reported in the Americas, Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Pacific.
  • The CDC has issued a Level 1 Travel Alert for several countries with measles outbreaks, including Greece, England, Serbia, Indonesia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Italy, Ukraine, the Philippines, Romania, and France. Travelers to these countries should make sure they are vaccinated against measles with the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine. For more information, please visit https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices.

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